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The discussions surrounding the re-opening of the Museum of Tervuren made us realise that the work of DiVersions might be more urgent than we originally thought. Three years into the project, we are only at the beginning of addressing large questions, such as the implications of digital technologies on representation, collaboration and access; the inherent problems of archiving and collecting; the troubles of institutional normativity and the assumptions of homogeneous identity that slip into cultural heritage policy and above all, how all this plays out in the complex Belgian environment and its specific colonial history.
 
The discussions surrounding the re-opening of the Museum of Tervuren made us realise that the work of DiVersions might be more urgent than we originally thought. Three years into the project, we are only at the beginning of addressing large questions, such as the implications of digital technologies on representation, collaboration and access; the inherent problems of archiving and collecting; the troubles of institutional normativity and the assumptions of homogeneous identity that slip into cultural heritage policy and above all, how all this plays out in the complex Belgian environment and its specific colonial history.
   
The construction of physical and digital repositories is a consequence of the social and symbolic capital that cultural heritage represents.<ref>UNESCO defines Cultural heritage as “the legacy of physical artefacts and intangible attributes of a group or society that are inherited from past generations, maintained in the present and bestowed for the benefit of future generations.“ http://www.unesco.org/new/en/cairo/culture/tangible-cultural-heritage/</ref> This value necessitates institutionalized archives, the keeping of digital/physical documents, and the establishment of codified practices that allow institutions to maintain their authority through classification and mediation. This mutual confirmation of what counts as heritage, as identity, as history and as beneficial future, constructs specific narratives that usually leave little room for a critique. However, especially in a digital context, possibilities might open up for archives of cultural artefacts that function as tools of resistance against oppression and annihilation.
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The construction of physical and digital repositories is a consequence of the social and symbolic capital that cultural heritage represents.<ref>UNESCO defines Cultural heritage as “the legacy of physical artifacts and intangible attributes of a group or society that are inherited from past generations, maintained in the present and bestowed for the benefit of future generations.“ http://www.unesco.org/new/en/cairo/culture/tangible-cultural-heritage/</ref> This value necessitates institutionalized archives, the keeping of digital/physical documents, and the establishment of codified practices that allow institutions to maintain their authority through classification and mediation. This mutual confirmation of what counts as heritage, as identity, as history and as beneficial future, constructs specific narratives that usually leave little room for a critique. However, possibilities open up for the practice of archiving cultural artifacts, especially in a digital context, as it can become a tool of resistance against oppression and annihilation.
   
 
To arrive at this potential is easier said than done as digital spaces themselves are permeated by seemingly neutral criteria, templates, standards, and so on. For example, database technologies routinely affirm the authority of certain kind of experts and not others; algorithms corroborate gender cliches and Wikipedia has surprisingly little space for deviating world views. DiVersions therefore not only attends to the digital items brought together in e-collections, but also to the way metadata, software packages and web technologies prevent or provide space for Di-Versions.
 
To arrive at this potential is easier said than done as digital spaces themselves are permeated by seemingly neutral criteria, templates, standards, and so on. For example, database technologies routinely affirm the authority of certain kind of experts and not others; algorithms corroborate gender cliches and Wikipedia has surprisingly little space for deviating world views. DiVersions therefore not only attends to the digital items brought together in e-collections, but also to the way metadata, software packages and web technologies prevent or provide space for Di-Versions.

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